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4 in 1 esc to 4 escs

leggyc

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So basically fried my 4 in 1 esc twice now and i'm over having to replace the whole thing when it dies so I want to switch to have 4 escs purely for the convenience but not too sure what bits I need (I'm very new to fpv). I have an Eachine wizard x220s. Am I right in thinking I need to replace the 4 in 1 esc with a power distribution board with the 4 escs as my flight controller does not have a built in pdb?

This is the current 4 in 1 esc

What escs I think I should replace it with (BLHeli_S and Dshot600 like the current 4 in 1)


Not sure what pdb maybe this one?


Any help would be greatly appreciated : )
 

leggyc

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Do you know how you fried it two times?
Once was sinking it in a puddle and they all went but the other time I think i had a small crash then it just dropped out the sky a few moments later and one of the motors stopped spinning. Here is a photo of it the second time it broke. You can see two MOSFETS just came off

IMG_20210430_121916.jpg
 
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I want to do this aswell because my ESC keeps breaking. How do you do it? There dosen't seem to be much online from other people doing the same thing.
 

harleydude

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This may be a stretch, but those solder joints look as if they could use some work. You may be creating a solder bridge which is creating resistance which will create heat which may be causing those MOSFETs to pop off. The wire should be touching the contact directly so you're not counting on the solder to create the bridge. If you look, the C2 solder joint looks as if the wire could be "floating" above the contact. I imagine these components are pushed to the limit when everything is at spec. So there's probably no much wiggle room there for error. Just a tought.

D
 

leggyc

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This may be a stretch, but those solder joints look as if they could use some work. You may be creating a solder bridge which is creating resistance which will create heat which may be causing those MOSFETs to pop off. The wire should be touching the contact directly so you're not counting on the solder to create the bridge. If you look, the C2 solder joint looks as if the wire could be "floating" above the contact. I imagine these components are pushed to the limit when everything is at spec. So there's probably no much wiggle room there for error. Just a tought.

D
Yeah my soldering job may be a bit dodgy which is why I want to switch to using 4 escs instead of one because if I mess it up again it's less hassle to replace which is what I'm trying to figure out how to convert to. Any help?
 

harleydude

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Yeah my soldering job may be a bit dodgy which is why I want to switch to using 4 escs instead of one because if I mess it up again it's less hassle to replace which is what I'm trying to figure out how to convert to. Any help?
What kind of soldering gun are you using? It may not be getting hot enough. I'm not a career professional solderer, but my solder joints are usually very good. Some bullet points:

* Make sure everything is clean (wire and contact)
* Use flux
* Make sure your soldering iron is fully heated
* Tin the wire
* Tin the contact
* If both are tinned sufficiently, a quick simultaneous touch of the iron to the wire while on the contact should suck the wire right down to the contact
* The solder joint should happen almost instantly. If you find that you're holding the soldering iron on your work for a few seconds, it's probably not hot enough. I use a 40 watt Weller pen-style iron for most work, but have a hefty gun (100 watts?) for heavy wire work.

Counter-intuitive, if your soldering iron isn't hot enough, it will take too long for the solder to melt and will heat up the contacts and wire too much, which may destroy your substrate.

Again, I'm not a soldering professional, but I HAVE been soldering cables and PC boards for many years with great success. So others may be able to add or amend my advice.

Also, there are a few YouTube tutorials out there that may help.

D
 
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leggyc

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What kind of soldering gun are you using? It may not be getting hot enough. I'm not a career professional solderer, but my solder joints are usually very good. Some bullet points:

* Make sure everything is clean (wire and contact)
* Use flux
* Make sure your soldering iron is fully heated
* Tin the wire
* Tin the contact
* If both are tinned sufficiently, a quick simultaneous touch of the iron to the wire while on the contact should suck the wire right down to the contact
* The solder joint should happen almost instantly. If you find that you're holding the soldering iron on your work for a few seconds, it's probably not hot enough. I use a 40 watt Weller pen-style iron for most work, but have a hefty gun (100 watts?) for heavy wire work.

Counter-intuitive, if your soldering iron isn't hot enough, it will take too long for the solder to melt and will heat up the contacts and wire too much, which may destroy your substrate.

Again, I'm not a soldering professional, but I HAVE been soldering cables and PC boards for many years with great success. So others may be able to add or amend my advice.

Also, there are a few YouTube tutorials out there that may help.

D
It's not the soldering I'm worried about at the moment it's selecting the correct components first which is what I was trying to figure out in the original post on this thread. That's what I need help with
 

harleydude

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It's not the soldering I'm worried about at the moment it's selecting the correct components first which is what I was trying to figure out in the original post on this thread. That's what I need help with
I hear what you're saying. But it's worth noting that throwing parts at your drone may not solve your problem. You could very well run into the same issue again because of the solder joints. There doesn't exist a single ESC that is engineered to compensate for cold solder joints or a solder bridge. Just sayin'...
But it's your drone.

Best of luck.

D
 

leggyc

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I get what you are saying but I still need to replace the broken part so that I can do a better job at soldering
 
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harleydude

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I get what you are saying but I still need to replace the broken part so that I can do a better job at soldering
Copy that. I see what you are saying....<;^)

Keep us in the loop. Anxious to see how this turns out.

D
 

Tomk_

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Back to your original question... I think:

Yes. In order to use individual ESCs you will need to add a PDB or change your FC to an All in one.

If all of the solder joints look like the ones pictured... flux is your friend. I'd add some flux and reflow everything.

Good luck.
 

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